Sunday 27 November 2022 \

 

Cancer

Cancer deaths rise to 9.6 million as populations grow and age

Cancer will claim the lives of 9.6 million people in 2018, accounting for one in eight of all deaths among men and one in 11 among women, the World Health Organization's cancer research agency said on Wednesday.
 
 

Turkish early cancer detection microchip claims awards

Two high school students in Turkey, who developed a microchip for early detection of cancer, have claimed yet another award.
 
Berna Akdeniz and Leyla Al Masoud -- developers of the microchip in western province of Izmir --  decided to study on early diagnosis of cancer in 2016 and after a year the duo developed a microfluidic chip to diagnose lung, breast and prostate cancers early.
 
 

Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.
 
Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.
 
It will now begin testing the method using some 250 urine samples, to see if samples at room temperature are suitable for analysis, Hitachi spokesman Chiharu Odaira told AFP.
 

Protein causing cancer cells to self-destruct discovered

The unusual protein, found in the skin cells of human beings and other warm-blooded animals, has a molecular structure similar to that of the toxins of snakes and other reptiles.
 
Molecular biologists from Moscow State University and the Russian Academy of Sciences have discovered proteins that can help suppress the growth of cancerous tumors. 
 
 

Starbucks coffee in California must have cancer warning, judge says

Starbucks Corp. and other coffee sellers must put a cancer warning on coffee sold in California, a Los Angeles judge has ruled, possibly exposing the companies to millions of dollars in fines.
 
A little-known not-for-profit group sued some 90 coffee retailers, including Starbucks, on grounds they were violating a California law requiring companies to warn consumers of chemicals in their products that could cause cancer.
 
 

UN: Cancer cases set to rise by half by 2030

Source : IINA / 05 Feb 2014

New cases of cancer will rise by half by 2030, reaching 21.6 million per year compared to 14 million in 2012, the UN said on Monday in a global analysis of the scourge.

 

Graphic anti-smoking ad launched

Source : BBC / 29 Dec 2012

A series of hard-hitting government adverts featuring people smoking cigarettes with a tumour growing from the end is being launched in England.

The ads will tell smokers that just 15 cigarettes can cause a mutation that leads to cancerous tumours in what marks a return to shock campaigning.

It is eight years since government's "fatty cigarette" anti-smoking adverts appeared.

 

Coffee Consumption Reduces Risk of Oral Cancer

Source : Jessica Berman / VOAnews / 15 Dec 2012

Coffee is one of the most popular beverages around the world. Now comes word from a very large study of Americans that the stimulating drink might play a role in reducing the risk of oral / pharyngeal cancer, a particularly deadly form of the disease.

One of the many questions put to the 970,000 American men and women taking part in the 30-year-old Cancer Prevention Study involved their coffee-drinking habits. The researchers — population study experts with the American Cancer Society — say the study has found that participants who drank about four cups of coffee per day reduced their risk of oral/pharyngeal cancer by 49 percent, compared to those who drank little or no coffee per day.

 

Diesel exhaust fumes may trigger cancer: WHO

By PressTV | 13 Jun 2012

Exhaust fumes from diesel engines, labeled as deadly as asbestos, arsenic and mustard gas, can cause cancer in humans, experts at the World Health Organization (WHO) say.

 

Immune boosters show promise against cancer

A pair of experimental treatments that fight cancer by boosting the immune system have shown promise in early studies and deserve testing in larger patient groups, said US research released yesterday.

The drugs, both made by Bristol-Myers Squibb, work by breaking down the shield that protects tumor cells. Rather than try to kill the cancer directly, they allow the immune system to do its work against the invading cells.

 
 

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