Wednesday 21 August 2019 \

 

Muslim women in Saudi Arabia

Saudi female student teaches poor children for free

She is a private tutor to many poor children. But she does not charge any tuition fees.
 
Zahra Hashem Al-Moslem, a Saudi female college student at Abdul Rahman Bin Faisal University in Al-Khobar, takes time off from her weekly schedule to teach poor children.
 
She told Al Arabiya English that the idea stared last year at a time when she was ill and being treated at a hospital.
 
 

37% of Arab women have experienced violence, UN workshop hears

Arab women and their protection took center stage at a regional workshop held by the UN in Beirut this week.
 
Held on Tuesday and Wednesday at the United Nations House in the Lebanese capital, the workshop to support women in the Arab region was organized by the UN’s Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA), the UN Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) and the Arab League. 
 
 

Riyadh-based airline to recruit Saudi women as co-pilots

Riyadh-based carrier Flynas has announced plans to recruit Saudi women to work as co-pilots and flight attendants for the first time, just months after the kingdom lifted a ban on female motorists.
 
Saudi Arabia in June ended a longstanding ban on women driving cars as Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman seeks to improve women's participation in the workforce and implement his Vision 2030.
 
 

Women drivers to transform Saudi auto market

Two months have passed since the official lifting of the ban on women driving in Saudi Arabia. The majority of women in Saudi Arabia are planning to drive a car. According to a new survey by YouGov, 24 percent of women have applied for a driving license since June 2018 and 61 percent of women who haven’t applied yet are willing to apply in the future.
However, there are women who are not willing to apply for a driving license. They have several concerns, most of them around safety.
 
 

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