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animals

The Spiritual Meaning of Sacrifice

By Maryam Hedayat | islam.ru | 03 Oct 2014

The historical background of Eid al-Adha is that the Prophet Ibrahim (may Allah be pleased with him) had a dream in which he was sacrificing his young son, Ismail (peace and blessings of Allah be upon him). Prophet Ibrahim, a great believer in Allah, took his dream literally and wanted to sacrifice his son. But, according to the tradition, Allah the Almighty sent his angels and asked him to sacrifice an animal instead of his son.

 

Treatment of Animals in Islam

Source : About.com / 11 Aug 2014

In Islam, mistreating an animal is considered a sin. The Quran and guidance from the Prophet Muhammad, as recorded in hadith, give many examples and directives about how Muslims should treat animals.

 

Rhino poaching toll reaches new high

Source : Newsrt / 21 Mar 2014

A famed scientist and founding former chairman of the Kenya Wildlife Service urged Kenya's president on Wednesday to invoke emergency measures to protect the country's elephants and rhinos from a poaching crisis sweeping Africa.

 

Crocodiles can climb trees: researchers

Source : Reuters / 17 Feb 2014

Most people entering crocodile territory keep a wary eye out on water and land, but research suggests they need to look up.

Though the reptiles lack obvious physical features to suggest this is possible, crocodiles in fact climb trees all the way to the crowns, according to University of Tennessee researcher Vladimir Dinets.

 

World's largest wild camel herd is down by a third in Australia

Source : BBC with Voice of Russia / 22 Nov 2013

Australia is famous for its wildlife - kangaroos, koalas and numerous species of snakes and spiders - but it is also home to the world's largest herd of camels. There are about 750,000 roaming wild in the outback and they cause a host of problems.

Camels were imported to Australia in the 19th century from Arabia, India and Afghanistan for transport and heavy work in the outback.

 

World's largest wild camel herd is down by a third in Australia

Source : BBC with Voice of Russia / 21 Nov 2013

Australia is famous for its wildlife - kangaroos, koalas and numerous species of snakes and spiders - but it is also home to the world's largest herd of camels. There are about 750,000 roaming wild in the outback and they cause a host of problems.

Camels were imported to Australia in the 19th century from Arabia, India and Afghanistan for transport and heavy work in the outback.

 

Heads turn at new owl species discovered in Oman

Source : Al Arabiya / 8 Oct 2013

A new owl breed has been discovered in the remote Jebel Akdhar mountains in Oman, ornithologists working in the Gulf state reported this week.

The Scottish wildlife sound-recordist, Magnus Robb, wrote “Strix Omanensis” officially exists from Oct. 4 on the website of “The Sound Approach,” an international project aiming to record and understand bird sounds.

 

Rare white tiger born in Baghdad zoo makes its first appearance

Source : Reuters / 30 Jul 2013

Keepers showed off a rare white Bengal tiger cub that was born in a Baghdad zoo two months earlier.

The cub, with its unusual white and black-striped coat, made its first public appearance at Al Zawra Zoo, playing with other tiger cubs and keepers.

The zoo's deputy director general, Salah Asker, said that the birth was a great conservation achievement.

 

Royal turtle: World’s second oldest animal dies in Cairo at age 280

Source : Al Arabiya / 26 Apr 2013

A turtle considered to be the second oldest animal in the world died this week in Egypt’s Giza Zoo at the age of 280, a local newspaper reported Thursday.

King Farouk, who became the ruler of Egypt in 1936, dedicated the ancient turtle to the zoo, reported the privately owned daily Youm 7.

 

Camels, well known in Arctic circles

By Matt Kwong / 16 Mar 2013

Everyone knows the camel as the ship of the desert - but new research is pointing towards its ancient ancestors actually being far more used to the cold of the north Canadian forests and the fat in the hump was essential for surviving in such a harsh climate, as Matt Kwong reports.

Think of camels, and the chances are that the image you conjure up is of magnificent, if surly, beasts trudging steadily across a sweltering desert dune. They are, in the minds of most people, inextricably connected with some of the hottest places on Earth.

 
 

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