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Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.
 
Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.
 
It will now begin testing the method using some 250 urine samples, to see if samples at room temperature are suitable for analysis, Hitachi spokesman Chiharu Odaira told AFP.
 

New brain cells in the old? Study stokes debate

People as old as 79 may still generate new brain cells, US researchers said Thursday, stoking fresh debate among scientists over whether or when our mental capacity ever stops growing.
 
The report by scientists at Columbia University in New York, published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, runs directly counter to a different study published in Nature last month which found no evidence of new neurons are being created past the age of 13.
 
 

Protein causing cancer cells to self-destruct discovered

The unusual protein, found in the skin cells of human beings and other warm-blooded animals, has a molecular structure similar to that of the toxins of snakes and other reptiles.
 
Molecular biologists from Moscow State University and the Russian Academy of Sciences have discovered proteins that can help suppress the growth of cancerous tumors. 
 
 

Origins of gold discovered in space

In August 2017, an explosion was spotted by scientists in a previously obscure galaxy called NGC 4993. The observation of that cataclysmic explosion has helped to explain the origin of gold on Earth. 
 
According to scientists, the burst of gravitational waves with tiny ripples in the fabric of space was an ultra-powerful collision between two neutron stars. Those collisions are in fact the cosmic forge in which gold and other precious metals are made, before being flung out into the universe. 
 
 

UN Study Links Man-Made Chemicals to Common Diseases

By Robert Evans | Reuters | 18 May 2013

Man-made chemicals in everyday products are likely to be at least the partial cause of a global surge in birth deformities, hormonal cancers and psychiatric diseases, a U.N.-sponsored research team reported on Tuesday.

 

Second-hand smoke increases dementia risk

Source : Presstv 18 Jan 2013

Researchers suggest that people exposed to environmental tobacco smoke are threatened by increasing risk of severe dementia syndromes.

Passive smoking, also known as ‘second-hand’ smoke, can cause neurological disease of dementia besides cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, according to the recent study conducted by the researchers from Anhui Medical University in China and King's College London.

 

Diabetes cases hit record and half go undiagnosed

Source : Agencies | 15 Nov 2012

Diabetes is running at record levels worldwide and half the people estimated to have the disease are, as yet, undiagnosed, according to a report on Wednesday.

The number of people living with diabetes is now put at 371 million, up from 366 million a year ago, with numbers expected to reach 552 million by 2030, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) said.

Diabetes is often viewed as a western problem, since the vast majority of people have type 2 disease which is linked to obesity and lack of exercise.

 

Islam open to stem cell research

By Dr Daud Batchelor | NST | 07 Nov 2012

The Malaysian medical fraternity has shown a timely initiative in holding on Oct 29 the first National Stem Cell Congress, opened by Health Minister Datuk Seri Liow Tiong Lai.

 

Stem cell breakthrough opens new medical window

By Ben Hirschler & Kate Kelland | Reuters | 11 Oct 2012

The Nobel Prize-winning discovery of how to reprogram ordinary cells to behave like embryonic stem cells offers a way to skirt around ethical problems with human embryos, but safety concerns make their future use in treating disease uncertain.

While researchers have already applied the scientific breakthroughs of Britain's John Gurdon and Japan's Shinya Yamanaka to study how diseases develop, making such cells into new treatments will involve a lot more checks.

 

Emotional Memories Can Be Erased From Our Brains

By Sarah Glynn | Medical News Today | 22 Sep 2012

A new study by Thomas Ågren, a doctoral candidate at the Department of Psychology, under the observation of Professors Mats Fredrikson and Tomas Furmark, has indicated that it is possible to erase newly formed emotional memories from the brain. This finding, published in Science, brings scientists a huge step forward in future research on memory and fear.

 
 

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