Tuesday 22 May 2018 \

 

Science & Environment

Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.
 
Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.
 
It will now begin testing the method using some 250 urine samples, to see if samples at room temperature are suitable for analysis, Hitachi spokesman Chiharu Odaira told AFP.
 

Turkey’s gift to the world: Tulips

Taken from the Turkic homeland in Central Asia's Pamir Mountains to Anatolia and spread worldwide, tulips continue to be the main theme for spring events.
 
Tulips were brought by Turks from Central Asia to Anatolia during the Turkic migration and have been used in decorative patterns since the 12th century. The plant also became a main theme in art, poems, stories, handicrafts and miniature crafts and its pattern was imprinted on mosque decorations, carpets, war helmets, robes, skirts and money.
 
 

Climate change may see 143M displaced

The worsening impact of climate change could force more than 143 million people to move within their countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and Latin America regions, said a report issued by the World Bank on late Monday. 
 
The report -- titled Groundswell – Preparing for Internal Climate Migration -- said the three regions represent 55 percent of the developing world’s population.
 
 

Origins of gold discovered in space

In August 2017, an explosion was spotted by scientists in a previously obscure galaxy called NGC 4993. The observation of that cataclysmic explosion has helped to explain the origin of gold on Earth. 
 
According to scientists, the burst of gravitational waves with tiny ripples in the fabric of space was an ultra-powerful collision between two neutron stars. Those collisions are in fact the cosmic forge in which gold and other precious metals are made, before being flung out into the universe. 
 
 

Indonesian and Bangladeshi Scientists Receive 2018 OWSD-Elsevier Foundation Awards

Two scientists from Asia have been awarded the 2018 OWSD-Elsevier Foundation Awards for Early-Career Women Scientists in the Developing World for their research in the physical sciences.

Launched in 2010 by the Elsevier Foundation, the awardees must have made a demonstrable impact on the research environment both at a regional and international level and have often overcome great challenges to achieve research excellence.

 

5 Muslim Inventions That Changed The World

Source : Agencies | 10 Oct 2014

Coffee

About 1,600,000,000 cups of coffee are consumed every day around the world. Billions of people rely on it as part of their daily routines. And yet, very few people are aware of the Muslim origins of this ubiquitous drink.

According to the historical record, in the 1400s coffee became a very popular drink among Muslims in Yemen, in the southern Arabian Peninsula. Legend goes that a shepherd (some say in Yemen, some say in Ethiopia) noticed that his goats became very energetic and jumpy when they ate beans from a particular tree. He had the courage to try them himself, noticing they gave him an energy boost. Over time, the tradition of roasting the beans and immersing them in water to create a sour yet powerful drink developed, and thus, coffee was born.

 

Solar power could be world's top electricity source by 2050, says IEA

Source : Guardian / 30 Sep 2014

Solar energy could be the top source of electricity by 2050, aided by plummeting costs of the equipment to generate it, a report from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the West’s energy watchdog, said on Monday.

 

Study finds solar system’s water older than the sun

Source : Reuters / 29 Sep 2014

Water found in Earth’s oceans, in meteorites and frozen in lunar craters predates the birth of the solar system, a study published on Thursday shows, a finding with implications for the search for life on other planets.

 

Weather forecasts predict colder winter in Europe this year

Source : Itar-Tass / 22 Sep 2014

The upcoming winter in European is expected to be colder than the 2012-2013 winter, Russian federal hydrometeorology and environmental monitoring service (Rosgidromet) said on Tuesday.

“Frequent invasions of cold air with short warm spells are expected,” said Rosgidromet head, Roman Vilfand.

 

World to see more people displaced

Source : AP / 18 Sep 2014

Natural disasters displaced almost 22 million people around the world last year and aid workers say they expect to see that number rise in the future, according to a report issued by a Norwegian humanitarian group on Wednesday.

 
 

Social Networks