Sunday 22 July 2018 \

 

Family & Health

Lifting weight helps beat depression, new study suggests

Having an exercise routine is important for bodily health, as it has been proven that adding muscle tone helps to decrease injury risk and improve bone health.
 
However, new scientific evidence suggests that regular strength training may also ward off and fight symptoms of depression.Brett Gordon from Limeric University in Ireland has conducted a study on 2,000 participants who are suffering from depression as well as with those who have no mental illnesses.
 
 

Gaming addiction classified as mental health disorder by WHO

Obsessive video gamers know how to anticipate dangers in virtual worlds. The World Health Organization says they now should be on guard for a danger in the real world: spending too much time playing.
 
In its latest revision to a disease classification manual, the UN health agency said Monday that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a mental health condition. The statement confirmed the fears of some parents but led critics to warn that it may risk stigmatizing too many young video players.
 
 

Marriage is (literally) good for the heart: study

Even if marriage is sometimes more a bed of nails than roses, living into old age with a partner may help ward off heart disease and stroke, researchers said Tuesday.
 
A sweeping survey of research conducted over the last two decades covering more than two million people aged 42 to 77 found that being hitched significantly reduced the risk of both maladies, they reported in the medical journal Heart.
 
 

Turkish early cancer detection microchip claims awards

Two high school students in Turkey, who developed a microchip for early detection of cancer, have claimed yet another award.
 
Berna Akdeniz and Leyla Al Masoud -- developers of the microchip in western province of Izmir --  decided to study on early diagnosis of cancer in 2016 and after a year the duo developed a microfluidic chip to diagnose lung, breast and prostate cancers early.
 
 

Six ways to get healthy this Ramadan

There are some of us who find ourselves piling on the pounds in Ramadan. Follow these quick tips by nutrition expert Myriam Sakr to stay healthy — and possibly even lose weight — during the Holy Month.
 
Drink water
 
 

Dates: A Middle Eastern delicacy

Dates are a staple food in Saudi Arabia and the wider Middle East, both in their own right and as a common ingredient in local dishes. In particular, they form an important part of the diet of Muslims during Ramadan, when they are traditionally eaten every evening to break the fast.
 
 

UN health agency aims to wipe out trans fats worldwide

The World Health Organization has released a plan to help countries wipe out trans fats from the global food supply in the next five years.
 
The United Nations agency has in the past pushed to exterminate infectious diseases, but now it’s aiming to erase a hazard linked to chronic illness.
 
 

New brain cells in the old? Study stokes debate

People as old as 79 may still generate new brain cells, US researchers said Thursday, stoking fresh debate among scientists over whether or when our mental capacity ever stops growing.
 
The report by scientists at Columbia University in New York, published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, runs directly counter to a different study published in Nature last month which found no evidence of new neurons are being created past the age of 13.
 
 

Protein causing cancer cells to self-destruct discovered

The unusual protein, found in the skin cells of human beings and other warm-blooded animals, has a molecular structure similar to that of the toxins of snakes and other reptiles.
 
Molecular biologists from Moscow State University and the Russian Academy of Sciences have discovered proteins that can help suppress the growth of cancerous tumors. 
 
 

Starbucks coffee in California must have cancer warning, judge says

Starbucks Corp. and other coffee sellers must put a cancer warning on coffee sold in California, a Los Angeles judge has ruled, possibly exposing the companies to millions of dollars in fines.
 
A little-known not-for-profit group sued some 90 coffee retailers, including Starbucks, on grounds they were violating a California law requiring companies to warn consumers of chemicals in their products that could cause cancer.
 
 
 

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