Sunday 22 July 2018 \

 

Art & Culture

Everybody's Taj, no one's monument

The Supreme Court was harsh on both the central government and the government of Uttar Pradesh on Wednesday on what it saw as their apathy and lethargy in protecting the Taj Mahal, and said that because no one seemed to be doing anything to protect the monument, it would start hearing the matter every day from July 31.
 
“You can shut down Taj. You can demolish (it) if you like and you can also do away with it if you have already decided,” said a bench of Justice MB Lokur and Justice Deepak Gupta.
 
 

Oxford University, UK’s oldest seat of learning, now a place more Muslim students are calling home

Arriving at the University of Oxford to begin her studies, Mahdiyah Rahman suddenly felt anxious. “I didn’t know how many other Muslim students would be there. I wasn’t sure what to expect.”
 
During her first week, the 19-year-old student discovered that there were just two other Muslims in Oriel, the Oxford college where she would eat, sleep and study during her time at the university. “I was the only one there wearing a headscarf,” she recalled. Over the summer Rahman had given little thought to the realities of practicing her faith at university, but standing in the crowded hall at Freshers’ Fair, surrounded by hundreds of stalls advertising student clubs and societies, she felt overwhelmed. 
 
 

Ten facts about Islam and Russia that everyone should know

There are a record-breaking seven Muslim-majority nations taking part in this year’s World Cup in Russia, meaning that millions of Muslim football fans have flooded the huge Eurasian country, turning it into one of the most ‘Muslim’ World Cups yet. But this isn’t the first time Russia has experienced a wave of Muslim arrivals. In fact, the country has an Islamic history stretching back almost 1400 years, as these great Muslim Russian facts reveal.      
 
RUSSIAN ISLAM’S SEVENTH-CENTURY ORIGINS
 

Turkey’s biggest library to open in Istanbul

Library with capacity of 7 million books to open for public in 2020

 

What makes Ramadan in Old Jeddah special

Old Jeddah (Al-Balad) is one of the most popular historic landmarks of the city. Locals and non-locals enjoy walking down the old alleys and admiring the remnants of old Hejaz, making it a favorite tourist attraction in the city.
 
According to Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) sources, its existence may date back to the era before Islam. Some of the buildings are 400 years old, and Old Jeddah is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
 
 

Rare silk Qur’an helps preserve Afghanistan’s cultural heritage

One of the only Qur’ans ever made from silk fabric has been completed in Afghanistan — a feat its creators hope will help preserve the country’s centuries-old tradition of calligraphy.
 
Each of the Islamic holy book’s 610 pages was produced by hand in a painstaking process that took a team of 38 calligraphers and artists specializing in miniatures nearly two years to finish.
 
 

Sounds of Ramadan that ring out through the ages

The Mesaharati, or public waker, is one of the oldest and most deeply rooted of Ramadan customs. The title is given to a person who voluntarily takes it on himself to wake up Muslims during the holy month to eat the suhoor meal before they start their fasting at the Fajr prayer call at dawn. 
 
Abdul-Muhsen Doom, the mesaharati in Al-Balad’s Ramadan Festival, said that the practice was mainly created because people used to go to bed after Taraweeh prayers every night. 
 
 

History goes under the hammer as London celebrates Islamic art

For aficionados of Middle Eastern art, London was the place to be this week. During the biannual Islamic Art Week, the big auction houses held sales of everything from antiquities to modern-art installations, with many works receiving well above their estimates. 
 
Sotheby’s 20th Century Art/Middle East on Tuesday featured two Saudi artists, Ahmed Mater and Maha Malluh, alongside works by  Morocco’s Farid Belkahia, Lebanon’s Paul Guiragossian, Iraq’s Shakir Hassan Al-Said and Syria’s Louai Kayali.
 

A Wrestling Culture That Helps Keep Boys Away From Fighting

Dagestan, a mostly Muslim region in the south of Russia on the northwest coast of the Caspian Sea, is known for the stark beauty of its mountain landscapes, for its many small ethnic groups, for a violent and long-simmering Islamist insurgency — and for its wrestlers.
 
Thousands of young boys here dream of becoming famous and honored wrestlers, like the many lithe and muscly Olympic champions who came before them. Buvaisar Saitiev won three gold medals, for example, and Mavlet Batirov two.
 
 

A dream travel destination for centuries

By Rashid Hassan / 25 Sep 2014

The incredible land of Saudi Arabia has been a dream travel destination for centuries and millions of people visit the Kingdom each year from around the world to see this wonderful land.

 
 

Social Networks